guess what i bought some seatone for my bully is name lennox
he is two but we are having trouble with back leg to which
we are told he has arthitis can u believe two my god well
lets hope these work for him he is so fabulous
joanna

——

Hi Joanna,

I haven’t heard of using Seatone as a supplement for arthritis – you might want to try
glucosamine supplements.

This could be what’s called a “luxating patella” or floating kneecap- a common genetic disorder in our bullies.
Unfortunately this type of injury can lead to arthritis even in a young bulldog because the loss of cartiledge
can lead to bone rubbing on bone.

He may need surgery to correct this and help prevent him from becoming lame and/or
suffering more arthritis.

Your can read a little more about it here:
http://www.bulldoghealth.com/bulldog-orthopedics.html

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan

Hi Jan,

I have some bad news regarding my 6 month old Bulldog Biggie, it seems he
has hip dysplasia, when he walks or sits the hip joint makes a loud popping
noise.

We are devastated considering he is from Champion bloodline from a breeder
with 40 years experience. What do you know about it? Do you have
advice regarding going back to the breeder, our goal was to show our dog and
to breed we have been considering starting our own line eventually after a
learning curve of course. From my understanding this malady would most
likely occur with backyard breeding and such. I am anxious to hear what you
think about it. I know we will need to get him neutered and most likely he
will eventually need a hip replacement, but ANY and all preventative
measures since it is early would be greatly appreciated.

I have really enjoyed the videos you have sent. Thanks for all of your
help.

Sherry

———-

Hi Sherry,

I’m sorry to hear that about Biggie. This definitely does not sound good.

Unfortunately all bulldogs have hip dysplasia to a degree because of their
specialized breeding. It is not exclusive to back yard breeders although they
would not be as careful as reputable breeders.

Championship breeding lines don’t guarantee your dog won’t have genetic
disorders. There are only so many bulldogs and they are very inbred.

The good news is Biggie is still young and some bulldogs grow so fast they
their joints can’t keep up with their bones and will manifest some hip problems.
When they mature the hip ligaments strengthen and the problem goes away.
This may resolve itself with time, or it may stay the same, or it may get worse –
only time will tell.

I would definitely tell the breeders about it because they need to know which
of their dogs passes this on. It is a genetic disorder and any dog that’s passed
on this gene should not be bred. It is possible that both parent dogs did not
show any signs of dysplasia and it was a recessive gene that was passed on,
so the breeders would have no idea this would happen.

A couple of suggestions about him would be to be sure you are not feeding him
too much because if he’s growing too fast the problem could worsen. Also,
don’t let him jump up and down on the furniture, car, bed, etc.

If he’s in pain there some medications you can give him, but be sure to consult
your vet before giving them to him.

You could also try acupuncture.

Here’s a site with some good information on hip dysplasia:
http://www.petshealth.com/dr_library/hipdysp.html

I hope you don’t give up on the breed because of this!

Your Bulldog Pal,

Jan

——–

Hi Jan,
Thanks so much the information you gave me is so helpful.  I feel more
adamate than ever that I would like to comit my life to breeding HEALTHY
bullddogs.  I am so in love with the breed that I cannot imagine having any
other type of dog.  They are high maintence though!  This gives me hope, I
am feeding a little more than the suggested for his wieght and I will take
it down to the minimum amount, but a wieght control diet wouldn’t be
suggested for a puppy would it?

Thanks again,
Sherry

——

Hi Sherry,

A puppy does tend to eat a lot, about 3 cups, but if he’s chubby, I’d
cut it down.
You always want to see his waist when you look down on him from above.
You should be able to feel his ribs under his skin – this takes some practice
on a bulldog!

A puppy can get overweight because they are always hungry and we have
trouble denying them.  But a lean dog is always healthier, especially in terms
of orthopedics because too much weight stresses a dog’s joints.

A lot of people thing a puppy should have a belly but I disagree with that
philosophy.  They should have a contoured body.  An overweight puppy
will be an overweight adult.

The puppy food has the extra calcium and nutrients a puppy needs when fed
in normal amounts.  You don’t need to feed him more than the recommended
for his weight.

That’s my opinion!  I keep my guys lean and I exercise them every day.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan