I am in the process of getting a bulldog puppy. i already put a deposit down. so in about a month i will be bringing her home.

Well see my question is, i have 2 other dogs at home, shih tzus. one male and one female. ok, well my we just found out that my female is going to be delivering on April 30th. ok, well i will be bringing my bullie baby home a little before the birth.

My question is do you think that we might have a problem with this.? I will have a private place for the female shih tzu to whelp. How do you think a bull dog and shih tzus will get along with each other?  Is this a mistake.

From my experience of being around bull dogs they seems sooo easy going and loving, im hoping she will fit right in with our family, is this possible?

Stacy

——–answer——

Hi Stacy,

Introducing a new puppy to home dogs does take some extra care,
but a few simple steps should help.  And yes, english bulldogs in
general are quite mellow and loving.

I’m not a behavior expert but I’m happy to give you my opinion.

I think they should all get along fine.  It’s the dogs you already have that
may potentially be a problem and need to be introduced properly to the
new puppy.

If you keep your dogs in crates this process could go much smoother,
but if you don’t it should be ok if you are mindful of a few things.

Dogs are pack animals and their instincts kick in when they see a new
dog in their midst.  You now have 2 dogs but 3 dogs constitutes a pack
and there will be ‘ranking’ in that pack.

Remember that you are the true alpha, or ruler of your pack and it is
up to you to set the tone and keep everyone in their place.

The pregnant female is going to be instinctually protective of her unborn
puppies, so she’s the one I would pay close attention to.

Fortunatley puppies do not pose as big a threat as an adult dog would.
That said, you have a pregnant female and are bringing in another
female.  Statistically the female dogs fight for rank more than the males.

It is best to introduce the puppy to your current dogs on a neutral location
like a local park or your neighbor’s yard.  When they meet, be sure to praise
them in a cheery voice to reward the behavior.

Let them sniff each other.  The puppy will probably bow down, which is a
sign of “lets play”.  If your dog’s hair starts to raise up, that is a sign of
aggression and you should probably separate them.

If things go well, which they usually do with a puppy, you can bring the
puppy in the house.  Be aware that a puppy will want to play with the
adult dogs a lot – possibly more than they want.  Your adult dogs may
growl to tell the puppy to lay off.  This is normal.

If you current dogs respond to the puppy by biting him, this could
be dangerous to the puppy so you need to keep an eye on them until
they all seem to be doing fine in their new pack.

This might sound scary, but usually these introductions go really well
when a puppy is involved.  I introduced my first bulldog puppy into a
household with an Akita and a cat.  We introduced the two dogs in the
front yard and they got along famously.  It was the cat that became the
benevolent dictator of the pack.

I’m attaching a pdf document from the Dumb Friends League with
more information for you.

Congratulations on your puppy and let me know how it goes.

Your Bulldog Pal,

Jan

Hi Jan,
I’m so glad you e mailed this, as a matter of fact my husband is responcible for purchasing our bullie. I had just lost my 14 yr old companion, an Old English mastiff, and was needless to say heartbroken. I took a little vacation to visit a friend, to help take my mind of my loss, only to discover when I arrived home this little bundle of cuteness awaited me. Being a dog lover since birth, at first I was angry at my husband, but after a day of sharing my space with this adorable creature, I was once again in love. Now if it was me purchasing a dog, I would have really investigated the breeders. Jim purchased Spike from an online breeder, I did some snooping, and although I get thousands of complements on Spike’s looks and friendliness, I am now dealing with some of the issues you mentioned in your  email.  He has terrible stains in the folds below his eyes, I am now treating this with medicine from the vet. I have also had his nostriles operated on because his snoring and breathing was so bad.  He is passing gas all the time, so bad that we have to leave the room. And I have noticed he vomits alot, I thought it was from me tugging his leash against his short throat. He is fed a product called Innova “puppie” which the pet shop in my neighborhood reccomended as it is all natural and suppose to be one of the best ( I say that with tongue in cheek) as I am a sceptic with all the commercial dog food products. I am a business owner and ashamed to admit I don’t have the time to cook for my family let alone my Spike. I have hunted the internet for any and all articles on bulldogs and I’m happy that I stumbled upon yours. I will go to all lengths for my animal, I’m happy that I can afford a purebreed and all I want is to give him the love and care that he returns to me everyday with his anticks and personality. THe bulldog is one funny critter, I can’t tell you the joy he has brought me. Owning a Mastiff was a very expensive endevor to say the least, he had skin issued, allergies, ear problems. So I know now how important preventitive care is. I could have put another child though 8 yrs of college with what I paid in vet expenses. I look forward to your reply and I want to thank you for your time to send me your emails. I was very impressed with your interviews and your knowledge.

Thank you again,

Rosemarie Tinsley

———-answer——–
Hi Rosemarie,

I’m not familiar with that breeder – did a quick search on the internet, but didn’t learn much.
Many breeders do their breeding for looks and for the money.  And many of them love the
breed but don’t really know what they’re doing.  Usually when I hear from someone, it’s
because they are having problems.

The problems you list are common, although in my opionion, they can be bred out of the
breed lines by conscientious breeders.But you love your bulldog so now what you need
to do is cope with what you have.

The eye problems are probably caused by eyelashes that are irritating Spike’s eyes.
I recommend you take him to an ophthalmologist who can treat them.

The gas can often be cured by elevating the food and feeding 3x a day instead of
once.

The vomiting is another thing that may be cured by elevating the food, but can also
be a more serious issue known as megasphagus.  You can read about that on my
blog:
https://bulldoghealth.wordpress.com/2008/01/11/bulldog-megasphagus-and-esophageal-motility-disorder/

I think Innova is the very best brand.  It is rich and can cause some digestive things
like gas and soft stools.  But it is particularly high quality.

I hope this helps.  Let me know if I can help you any further.

Your Bulldog Pal,

Jan

Jan, I am a new english bulldog owner of a wonderful 9 week old we’ve named Roxie.
I have read a lot of internet information, and have become somewhat of a
hypochondriac worry about her well-being.  We just took her yesterday for
her initial vet visit, and was informed that she has Toxicidia.  The vet put
her on a 10 day oral antibiotic.  He said that otherwise she appears to be
healthy.  I am going to order your book, in hopes that it will relieve some
of my concerns.  She is our second dog, but has absolutely captivated our
hearts in the short time we’ve had her.  Will stay in touch.

Eric

—–answer——-

Hi Eric,

I’m sorry to hear your english bulldog puppy has parasites.
Did you mean Coccidia?  It’s a parasite that’s found in soil and feces.
It’s fairly common along with other parasites that can infect dogs.
It usually affects puppies and is highly contagious from dog to dog.

From what I understand it is fairly common and often clears up on
it’s own, but with a bulldog or any puppy it needs to be treated
because they do not have fully developed immune systems.

Here’s a couple links to more information:

http://www.petsandparasites.org/dog-owners/coccidia.html

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_coccidia.html

She should recover fine from this but I’d be wondering if all the puppies
of this breeder are also infected.

And you should be careful to clean all bedding and any feces from
your yard so that she doesn’t get reinfected.

Glad to hear you’re ordering the book.  Bulldogs are great dogs and
you just need to know what to look for in their “special needs”.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan

Dear Jan,

We have a 4 month old Bull.  When we got her, the breeder gave her a Bortedella shot the day we picked her up.  4 days later she contracted pneumonia.  We treated her successfully with antibiotics and a vaporizer.  A week ago, on a follow up visit. Our vet suggested that she get an intra-nasal dose as we were taking her to conformation classes  and would be exposed other show dogs.  4 days later,  she began to  experience lethargy, elevated temp, and lose interest in eating and or drinking.  immediately I returned to the vet and he gave her antibiotics and in 24 hours she was back to normal.We also are worried as she has gotten pimples and redness on her head and eyes that looks like a skin infection.  Any thoughts???

Sincerely,
Bob and Kathie

—–answer—–

Hi Bob and Kathie,

Poor gal.  It sounds like she’s getting aspiration pneumonia from the nasal dosing,
so I’d be careful about doing that again.

As for the pimples on her face, she may have a staph infection.  You can try to
treat it with Neosporin or another anti-biotic cream.  But it could be a parasite
or a fungus which would be treated differently.

Because of her young age, I would take her to a skin specialist who would do
skin scrapings and determine what it is so it can be treated properly.

Pups don’t have fully developed immune systems and when weakened by disease
(pneumonia in this case) they can get other opportunistic infections.  That’s what
happened to my Vivy.

I hope this helps.  Let me know how she’s doing.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan

Hi there,

I was recently on your website reading all your knowledge on our adorable friends.

I have two British bulldogs one male and the other female, they are both only a day apart in age and are 10 months old.

I brought them from different breeders so they are not blood related, in the idea of breeding them one day.

All up until a month ago i have come into some problems that have concerned me extremely.

My Female has become very aggressive towards the male, she dominates him over food, toys and human affection. They are calm all up until i walk in the backyard to play with them she becomes very aggressive and attacks him. The male is very placid and does not want to fight with her but she does not stop.

I have tried stopping her with spraying her with water but she likes the water and thinks its a game, I have since separated them at feeding times and this i feel has caused more aggression with her.

Up until 2 days ago i never smacked her but she was attacking him so much i smacked her with a shoe and this has now caused her to be upset with me, she will no longer come to me for a play and he will not come near me for the fact that she will attack him.

I love my puppies and would hate to see one of them go, i have contacted my local vet and there answer was to get rid of one of them. I do not want to get rid of one as i love them both but on the other hand is it cruel to leave him feeling scared in his own enviroment??

With my male he is very loveable but he has an aggressive streak towards children which iam quiet scared of, i would never leave an animal with a child un attended, but it concerns me as he has been brought up with young children.

Kind regards for reading me problems

Ellen

———–

Hi Ellen,

I’m not an expert on training, but I suspect your problems are stemming from
the fact that there is no clear leader in the “pack”

You need to take control of your dogs so they look to you as the alpha dog.
Your female is stepping in because she thinks you are not doing the alpha
job.  Then the male looks to dominate other threats to the pack (the children).

Female dogs are usually more dominant than male dogs.  They want to
take control and male dogs tend to be more submissive and easy going.

Since both of your dogs are still puppies, they are just learning how to
behave, and they take their cues from you.

It is very important that you become the leader.  You cannot do this by
behavior that she thinks is a game (the squirt water) or punishment (hitting
her with the shoe).  She is very confused because she thinks she’s doing
her job.  When she gets punished for what she perceives as ‘good’ behavior
she will naturally avoid you.  She’s now afraid to come to you.

There was a very good episode of the Dog Whisperer about bulldogs with
the same behavior pattern.  I can’t remember the name of it, but it was on
my local cable.

My advice is you get a very good trainer immediately.  When I had an
aggression problem with Vivy I hired Barkbusters.  They are expensive,
but did a wonderful job in one day!  There are many competent trainers
out there, so you could contact your local bulldog group.  I think your
vet’s suggestion is just plain ignorant.

Part of the training process is to teach you how to be the leader.  In my
case, since Vivy was ten, it took a lot of leash training.

Do not delay because you will have an escalating problem that will become
more difficult the longer you wait.

I hope this helps.  Let me know how they’re doing.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan

Hi Jan,

I have some bad news regarding my 6 month old Bulldog Biggie, it seems he
has hip dysplasia, when he walks or sits the hip joint makes a loud popping
noise.

We are devastated considering he is from Champion bloodline from a breeder
with 40 years experience. What do you know about it? Do you have
advice regarding going back to the breeder, our goal was to show our dog and
to breed we have been considering starting our own line eventually after a
learning curve of course. From my understanding this malady would most
likely occur with backyard breeding and such. I am anxious to hear what you
think about it. I know we will need to get him neutered and most likely he
will eventually need a hip replacement, but ANY and all preventative
measures since it is early would be greatly appreciated.

I have really enjoyed the videos you have sent. Thanks for all of your
help.

Sherry

———-

Hi Sherry,

I’m sorry to hear that about Biggie. This definitely does not sound good.

Unfortunately all bulldogs have hip dysplasia to a degree because of their
specialized breeding. It is not exclusive to back yard breeders although they
would not be as careful as reputable breeders.

Championship breeding lines don’t guarantee your dog won’t have genetic
disorders. There are only so many bulldogs and they are very inbred.

The good news is Biggie is still young and some bulldogs grow so fast they
their joints can’t keep up with their bones and will manifest some hip problems.
When they mature the hip ligaments strengthen and the problem goes away.
This may resolve itself with time, or it may stay the same, or it may get worse –
only time will tell.

I would definitely tell the breeders about it because they need to know which
of their dogs passes this on. It is a genetic disorder and any dog that’s passed
on this gene should not be bred. It is possible that both parent dogs did not
show any signs of dysplasia and it was a recessive gene that was passed on,
so the breeders would have no idea this would happen.

A couple of suggestions about him would be to be sure you are not feeding him
too much because if he’s growing too fast the problem could worsen. Also,
don’t let him jump up and down on the furniture, car, bed, etc.

If he’s in pain there some medications you can give him, but be sure to consult
your vet before giving them to him.

You could also try acupuncture.

Here’s a site with some good information on hip dysplasia:
http://www.petshealth.com/dr_library/hipdysp.html

I hope you don’t give up on the breed because of this!

Your Bulldog Pal,

Jan

——–

Hi Jan,
Thanks so much the information you gave me is so helpful.  I feel more
adamate than ever that I would like to comit my life to breeding HEALTHY
bullddogs.  I am so in love with the breed that I cannot imagine having any
other type of dog.  They are high maintence though!  This gives me hope, I
am feeding a little more than the suggested for his wieght and I will take
it down to the minimum amount, but a wieght control diet wouldn’t be
suggested for a puppy would it?

Thanks again,
Sherry

——

Hi Sherry,

A puppy does tend to eat a lot, about 3 cups, but if he’s chubby, I’d
cut it down.
You always want to see his waist when you look down on him from above.
You should be able to feel his ribs under his skin – this takes some practice
on a bulldog!

A puppy can get overweight because they are always hungry and we have
trouble denying them.  But a lean dog is always healthier, especially in terms
of orthopedics because too much weight stresses a dog’s joints.

A lot of people thing a puppy should have a belly but I disagree with that
philosophy.  They should have a contoured body.  An overweight puppy
will be an overweight adult.

The puppy food has the extra calcium and nutrients a puppy needs when fed
in normal amounts.  You don’t need to feed him more than the recommended
for his weight.

That’s my opinion!  I keep my guys lean and I exercise them every day.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan

Dear Jan,

I just downloaded your book – I’ve been skimming through it a little
and I think it’s great! Can’t wait until I can sit down and really
dig in (i.e. when the baby is sleeping!).
We just put a deposit on a bulldog pup and he’ll most likely be ready
to come home around the first week of March. This is our first
bulldog – as we’ve always had labrador
retrievers in the past.

I was wondering – what is the best collar to use on a bulldog? I’ve
heard that bulldogs can be stubborn to train sometimes, but I do not
want to harm the dog by putting
a chain or collar on him that will choke him. I’ve heard good things
about harnesses, but are they effective in training the dog? I am not
looking for SUPER DOG here – just
the basics really. I’d love him to walk calmly next to me and sit and
stay and down. that’s about it for me!

Any advice on what I should get would be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,
Nina

—-

Hi Nina,

Congratulations on your decision to get a bulldog! They are truly unique
and wonderful dogs. And I’m glad you are reading all about them to get
prepared for your new puppy.

There is some debate on the bulldog collar. Some say you must use a
harness because a collar or chain can harm the bulldog’s small trachea,
causing it to collapse. Others claim the bulldog has such a strong neck
that the muscles protect the trachea.

I tend to be in the latter group, especially in reference to training. A
bulldog can be quite independent when it comes to training. As my
trainer said, they can cooperate in a lesson for just so long and then
they have had enough and won’t cooperate anymore and can get
very stubborn at that point.

So keep your initial training sessions short (about 15-20 minutes). A
bulldog is about the opposite of a retriever in terms of readiness to please.
This isn’t to say they don’t want to please you, they do, but they prefer
smaller doses of training and repetition, repetition, repetition.

Back to the collar. I use a collar that is part fabric (about 1.5 inches)
and part chain. So it stays loose, and you can snap it to correct him.
I think these are available at most pet stores. The important thing
to remember is to snap back on the leash, not to pull which could
result in choking.

You also want to keep the collar high on the neck of your dog to
simulate pressure point the mother dog would use on a pup.

When my dogs were puppies I tried using a harness, but it is really
not as effective as a collar and I found I was not able to easily control
a 50 lb bulldog.

I hope this helps. Please write with any more questions.

Your Bulldog Pal,
Jan